Blackfoot Valley Dispatch - The Blackfoot Valley's News Source Since 1980

COVID-19 related July 4th event changes

 


Parade

Lincoln Valley Chamber of Commerce President Kate Radford said the LVCC is working to include many of the guidance strategies from Public Health’s Phase 2 Event Planning guidelines.

The parade route will be extended down to Sucker Creek Road to give attendees more space to park and socially distance.

Attendees are encouraged to wear masks in addition to practicing social distancing. A small number of masks will be available outside Rusty Relics near the center of Lincoln.

Anyone feeling sick is encouraged to stay away from the event or to leave if they begin feeling sick.

Fireworks

Public Health and the LVCC also worked together to create a plan for the Lincoln Fireworks show, which was approved. Fireworks will begin at dusk on July 4.

The plan encourages attendees to watch fireworks from their cars or other places where it is easy to socially distance at least six feet.

Individuals are also encouraged to practice social distancing when setting off their own fireworks.

Lincoln Rodeo

This year, the Lincoln Rodeo Club has been working to implement plans that will help spectators and fans stay as safe as possible.

The gate at the Rodeo Grounds features signage recommending social distancing, and includes an “Enter at your own Risk” warning.

The club will have a supply of masks on hand for spectators.

The Rodeo Grounds will have separate entrance and exit, similar to one-way aisles in stores, to help limit unexpected or unprotected face-to-face encounters.

Paint markings on the hillside above the arena to provide guidance for where people should not stand or congregate, and to help ensure group sizes remain within the re-opening guidelines, but are distant enough from one another. “That’s our savior, a big open hill,” Rodeo Club President Christ Lewenight said.

The limited bench seating installed on the hill will have signs indicating where people can and cannot sit, due to social distancing requirements.

The biggest change this year will be the inclusion of food trucks. Lewenight said Public health denied the permit for the rodeo to serve food at their snack bar. Instead, they are working to bring in three vendors to provide food.

The Rodeo club will still provide beer pop and water, but the beer tent will be set up at a 90-degree angle to the snack bar building, to provide a one-way entrance into the area where the food trucks will be set up. Once the customer purchase their food and drink, they will have to exit on the far side of the snack bar building to return to their seats. The change is designed to limit the normal crowds that gather near the beer tent and to move people smoothly into and out of the food and drink area without creating congestion.

The club has added an additional disinfectant station near the hand washing sinks on the north side of the snack bar, and around other areas of the Rodeo grounds.

Although the grounds can be crowded with horse trailers, Lewenight said the participants and their families usually spread out enough in their own personal areas that social distancing isn’t a big concern there.

During events riders can wind up close to one another, or to rodeo contractor personnel who may be helping them prepare for their rides. Lewenight said the rodeo contractor is responsible for the protocols used by their personnel inside the arena.

 

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