The Blackfoot Valley's News Source Since 1980

Articles written by Leanne Mccrate


Sorted by date  Results 1 - 25 of 80

  • Dear Dietitian: COVID-19

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Apr 7, 2020

    Dear Readers: These are uncertain times, and if you're like me, uncertainty is not one of your favorite topics. We have not yet reached the peak of the coronavirus pandemic. Unfortunately, some people have lost their jobs, and many of the lucky ones are working from home. Times like these can trigger emotions of anxiety and grief, and when we are experiencing difficult feelings, we may try to push those feelings down with extra food. You've heard of it, maybe participated in i...

  • Dear Dietitian: Heart Disease

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Mar 25, 2020

    Dear Readers: This past week I attended the funeral of my best friend's brother who died suddenly of a massive heart attack. He was only 49. You don't realize how many lives one life touches until you attend a funeral. The exchange of love and support between friends and family, the stories that begin with "Remember when . . .?", the laughter that softens the tears. Does the dearly departed know how much he meant to other people? I sure hope so. Heart disease is the number one...

  • Dear Dietitian: Sugar

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Mar 18, 2020

    Dear Dietitian, I’ve been working hard on eating healthy this year, and I read your column regularly. I have been surprised at how much sugar is in foods that I thought were good for me. Do you have a list of these foods? Thank you, Angela Dear Angela, Remember, it’s the food company’s job to make a product that takes good, not necessarily one that improves your health. An easy way to do that is to add sugar. The American Heart Association recommends women consume no more...

  • Dear Dietitian: The 50's

    Leanne McCrate, Featured columnist|Updated Mar 10, 2020

    Dear Dietitian, I’ve recently stumbled upon a few articles touting a return to the diets of the 1950s, which were influenced by war-time rationing. They say people ate healthier. What are the pros and cons of following a typical diet from that era? Sincerely, Rick Dear Rick, These days there are several ways to eat healthy, and sometimes this can be confusing for people. Recently, there has been an interest in returning to a 1950s style of eating, but did people really eat h...

  • Dear Dietitian: My Plate

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Mar 3, 2020

    Dear Dietitian, I'm familiar with the food pyramid and five food groups used to help guide food choices over the years. I see some older references to seven food groups. What was this about, and why have we changed things over the years? Thanks, Joe Dear Joe, The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) has published nutrition guidelines since 1894. It has changed over the years, and the more things change, the more they stay the same. In 1943, there were the "Basic 7" food...

  • Dear Dietitian

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Feb 25, 2020

    Dear Readers, By now, you probably know someone who has adopted a vegetarian diet. Estimates put vegetarianism at around 5% of the American population (1). That may not sound like many, but it comes to roughly 16.5 million people. People cite different reasons for converting to vegetarianism, from better health to environmental factors to better treatment of animals. There are various types of vegetarians, but all base their diets on plant foods. Vegans- eat only plant foods....

  • Dear Dietitian: Conflicting Information

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Feb 18, 2020

    Dear Dietitian, I have been educating myself on healthy nutrition. There is a lot of conflicting information on the internet, and sometimes it's downright frustrating! Can you help steer me in the right direction? Thanks, Jim Dear Jim, Believe me, I share in your frustration in regards to nutrition information. The internet has brought nutrition information to our fingertips, but at least half of it is false or misleading. But rest assured, the truth is out there and, in many...

  • Dear Dietitian

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Feb 11, 2020

    Dear Dietitian, I have had diabetes for fifteen years and have kept it under good control. But recently, my blood sugars have been higher, around 200 during the day. My daughter thinks I should try the glycemic index diet. What do you think? Terry Dear Terry, The glycemic index diet was introduced by Jenkins et al. in the early 1980s as a ranking system for carbohydrates based on their immediate impact on blood glucose levels (1). It was developed as a meal-planning guide for...

  • Dear Dietitian

    Leanne McCrate, Featured columnist|Updated Feb 4, 2020

    Dear Dietitian, I am health conscious and try to get enough fiber in my diet, but sometimes I miss the mark. I noticed some protein bars have 10 grams of fiber. Are these good for you? Jim Dear Jim, The Dietary Guidelines recommend Americans consume 25 to 30 grams of fiber per day. Fiber is found naturally in plant foods and is defined as an indigestible carbohydrate. This simply means the human body cannot break down fiber, and it passes through the digestive system unchanged...

  • Dear Dietician

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Jan 28, 2020

    Dear Readers, Last week we discussed U.S. News' rankings of the top three diets for overall health, so it seems only balanced to discuss the bottom three this week. A panel of nutrition experts evaluated the diets based on seven categories: how easy it is to follow, its ability to produce short-term and long-term weight loss, its nutritional completeness, its safety and its potential for preventing and managing diabetes and heart disease (1). Coming in at #33 is the Whole 30...

  • Dear Dietician: Diets

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Jan 21, 2020

    Dear Readers, Now that we are getting settled into the new year, many of us are working on getting healthier. There is so much information about diets, sometimes it's hard to know what is really good for you. U.S. News rated 35 diets, and coming in first for overall health (not just weight loss) was the Mediterranean Diet; the Flexitarian and DASH Diets tied for second place. A panel of nutrition experts ranked the diets based on seven categories: how easy it is to follow,...

  • Dear Dietician: Sugars

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Jan 14, 2020

    Dear Readers, Another year is behind us, and now it's time to get back to our normal routines. Many of us, including myself, have overeaten during the holidays; it's just part of it. It's a great time with family, close friends, and homemade desserts. Every year a family friend bakes a homemade pecan pie using fresh pecans from her own property, and believe me, it is a slice of paradise! Special occasions aside, Americans eat a lot of sugar, with some estimates totaling 57...

  • Dear Dietitian: Resolutions

    Leanne McCrate, Featured colimnist|Updated Jan 7, 2020

    Dear Readers, The New Year is upon us, and along with it, come those resolutions. There is room for improvement in all our lives, right? As many as 70% of Americans will resolve to eat healthier in 2020. Others will set a goal to exercise on a regular basis. And of course, many will seek to lose weight. Eating healthier is a lifestyle change; it’s as simple as that. There is no such thing as magic. There are no pills to melt fat away and no diets to trick your body into burnin...

  • Dear Dietitian: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Jan 1, 2020

    Dear Readers, I thought it would be good to end 2019 on a positive note, and according to an analysis of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), American diets are getting healthier! The overall Healthy Eating Index increased from 55.7 to 57.7 (1). This may not seem like much, but scientists found it statistically significant. A synopsis of the findings is below: • Americans decreased energy intake of low-quality carbohydrates by 3.25 percent (2). E...

  • Dear Dietician: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Dec 23, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, My husband has been diagnosed with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. His doctor told him to lose weight, and he tries, but he ends up getting discouraged and goes off his diet. I'm worried about his health, but what can I do? Lauren Dear Lauren, One of the most difficult things in life is watching someone struggle with a health condition. It is perhaps more difficult than when we struggle ourselves. Of course, you worry about your husband's health, and you...

  • Dear Dietician: meat substitutes

    Leanne McCrate, Featured columnist|Updated Dec 17, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, This past weekend, a friend encouraged me to try a meatless burger. I was pleasantly surprised to find that it was delicious and tasted like meat! Are these meatless substitutes healthier than meat? Thanks, Josh Dear Josh, When it comes to consumer satisfaction, burgers made with meat substitutes taste like meat, look like meat, and have a similar texture. An increased number of consumers are switching to plant-based diets for many reasons, including...

  • Dear Dietician: FODMAP

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Dec 11, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, I have irritable bowel syndrome and appreciated your column on a high fiber diet to manage IBS. My symptoms are usually pretty well-controlled, thank goodness. I've been reading about the low FODMAP diet, and it seems pretty detailed. Should I try it? Thanks, Katie Dear Katie, The low FODMAP diet was created by a research team at the Monash University in Melbourne, Australia as a treatment for irritable bowel disease (IBS) (1). As you know, IBS is an...

  • Dear Dietician: Tryptophan

    Leanne McCrate|Updated Dec 4, 2019

    Dear Readers, Soon we will be celebrating one of America's favorite holidays, a day our ancestors set aside to give thanks for a plentiful harvest. It's a time to reconnect with friends and family we haven't seen in a while, with lots of food, fun, and football. Many of us will settle in for a big meal with turkey and dressing, and pumpkin pie. We may eat more than usual, become a bit drowsy, take a nap, wake up and eat some more! There has been an age-old tale that it's the...

  • Dear Dietician: IBS

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Dec 4, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, I was recently hospitalized overnight for irritable bowel syndrome. The abdominal pain was treated, then I was released the next morning. I was not given any information on what diet I should follow. Can you help? Julie Dear Julie, A flare-up of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) can be very painful, but the good news is it can be well-managed with diet and lifestyle changes. IBS is a common intestinal disorder that affects 25-45 million Americans. It requires a...

  • Dear Dietitian: Small bowel obstruction

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Nov 13, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, I recently had surgery to correct a small bowel obstruction. I have been following a low fiber diet, but now I've been instructed to transition to a high fiber diet. My question is how much fiber do I need and should I increase it all at once? Betty Dear Betty, For readers who are not familiar, a small bowel obstruction (SBO) is just as it sounds; it's a blockage in the small intestine, and digested food cannot pass into the colon (large intestine). The...

  • Dear Dietician: Cold and flu season

    Leanne McCrate|Updated Nov 5, 2019

    Dear Readers, It is estimated that the common cold is responsible for 150 million missed workdays each year in the United States (1). With cold and flu season fast-approaching, many of us will be headed to the nutrition supplement aisle in an attempt to ward off these nasty viruses. But do these supplements really work? We investigated four of them, and this is what we found: Elderberry- In one small study, elderberry syrup given four times daily was found to improve symptoms...

  • Dear Dietician: Nutrition attitudes

    Leanne McCrate|Updated Oct 29, 2019

    Dear Readers: Have you ever endured the unpleasant experience of someone criticizing or ridiculing your food choices? One day at lunch, the dietitians were enjoying a party and dining on cheesy foods and rich desserts. A coworker passed by and commented, "Maybe you all should take your name tags off so no one knows that you all are dietitians." She thought it was funny; I didn't. It was actually a reader who brought this idea for a column to my attention. After much thought,...

  • Dear Dietician: Raw Milk

    Leanne McCrate, Featured Columnist|Updated Oct 22, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, I have a friend who drinks raw, unpasteurized milk. She claims it has many health benefits, and that pasteurization of milk is unnecessary. What do you think? Jim Dear Jim, The consumption of raw milk has gained popularity in recent years, and many people believe it is a healthier alternative to pasteurized milk. Let's take a look at what science says. Most of us are familiar with the term pasteurization, which is the process of heating food products like...

  • Dear Dietitian: Eating healthy

    Leanne McCrate, Featured columnist|Updated Oct 16, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, Please settle an argument between my wife and me. Our eleven-year-old son is about twenty pounds overweight. My wife, who has been thin all her life, wants to put him on a diet to get him on the right track. I am against the idea of a diet. What do you think? Concerned Dad Dear Dad, While your son may be overweight, it is wise to approach this problem with a lasting solution instead of a weight loss diet. For the main reason, a diet is likely to begin a yo-yo...

  • Dear Dietician: orthorexia

    Leanne McCrate|Updated Oct 9, 2019

    Dear Dietitian, My thirteen-year-old daughter started a new healthy eating program about six months ago. She seems obsessed with healthy eating and sometimes refuses to eat when she stays over at a friend's house. I am concerned about her behavior. Is this something serious or will she grow out of it? Sheila Dear Sheila, The desire to eat right is a healthy, but too much of a good thing is no longer a good thing. New light is being shed on an obsessive pattern of eating known...

Page Down

Rendered 05/24/2024 18:36